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The electoral register and the open register

The electoral register and the open register

There are two versions of the electoral register.

Every person applying to become registered is asked to choose whether to have their details excluded from the open register. Exclusion from the open register will not affect your voting rights or credit status.

Any elector can contact us at any time to ask us to remove their details from the open register. You will need to specify your name and address and that you want your details excluded from it.

You can do this by phoning 01529 414155 or emailing  elections@n-kesteven.gov.uk

Using information received from the public, registration officers keep two registers - the electoral register and the open register (also known as the edited register)

The electoral register

The electoral register lists the names and addresses of everyone who is registered to vote in public elections. The register is used for electoral purposes, such as making sure only eligible people can vote. It is also used for other limited purposes specified in law, such as:

  • detecting crime (e.g. fraud)
  • calling people for jury service
  • checking credit applications

It is a criminal offence for anyone to supply or use the register for anything else.

The open register

The open register is an extract of the electoral register, but is not used for elections. It can be bought by any person, company or organisation. Your name and address will be included in the open register unless you ask for them to be removed. Removing your details from the open register does not affect your right to vote.

You can find more information about both registers and how they may be used at www.gov.uk/register-to-vote

Who uses the open register?

Users of the open register include:

  • Businesses checking the identity and address details of people who apply for their services such as insurance, goods hire and property rental, as well as when they shop online
  • Charities and voluntary agencies
  • Debt collection agencies
  • Direct marketing firms
  • Landlords and letting agents
  • Local councils when identifying and contacting residents;
  • Online directory firms to help users of the websites find people, such as when reuniting friends and families;
  • Organisations tracing and identifying beneficiaries of wills, pensions and insurance policies;
  • Private sector firms to verify details of job applicants.